Heather Teague and the Kentucky coal connection

1. I know what the federal government sold us in regards to the Paul Lloyd methamphetamine case, but I’m not buying it. I don’t think the public should purchase either. There is no planet, galaxy, or universe where I’m believing Paul Lloyd was Michael Herron’s drug boss.

2. A couple of years ago, Paul Lloyd and Jinger DeMent met with Sarah Teague and her daughter, Heather’s sister. Lloyd and Dement’s reason for meeting with Sarah was simple: they wanted to convince Sarah that Paul Lloyd had nothing to do with Heather’s disappearance.

3. Several years ago, a person with ties to the coal industry gave Sarah an important tip: they had seen a book, possibly a notebook or scrapbook, containing disturbing information about her daughter’s disappearance. They said one of the statements in the book indicated Heather Teague had confronted Paul Lloyd about underage girls in the club and drugs.

4. The next page of the book contained a photo depicting two men dragging a young woman somewhere, a woman that, to this person’s knowledge, appeared to be Heather Teague.

5. Until now, Sarah assumed the notebook belonged to someone in law enforcement, hopefully someone who maybe had taken the notebook home with them to work on the case after-hours.

6. I, however, think this person saw “The Blackmail Book.” I then remembered mention of a book in one of the FBI files (full file found at “The Man at the Birthday Party”):

someone-called-in-1997-1998-wanting-a-book-seen-previously

7. Back in 1990, Kentucky coal production began declining, and in a big way. Coal mining jobs had decreased from almost 50,000 laborers in 1979 to less than 20,000 in 1999. Several factors contributed, but the discovery of cleaner-burning, easier-to mine coal out West coupled with recent EPA restrictions on nitrogen oxide emissions played a large part. In fact, the minutes from a meeting of the “Special Subcommittee of Energy” held in April of 1999 states, “The Tennessee Valley Authority and Kentucky Utilities have been test burning western US coal” in order to see if coal from those states could “be used to help meet the reduction standards.” That must have been a real kick in the gut if you were a coal operator in the state of Kentucky.

8. Michael Herron’s daddy, Senator Paul Herron, was a member of the “Special Subcommittee of Energy.”

9. During the Paul Lloyd-Sarah Teague meeting, Lloyd describes how the strip club, Untouchables, came into existence:

“I had been through a bankruptcy, in Providence. I was head of a company called Hawk Industries. When the acid rain legislation came in, coal companies filed bankruptcies… (I) was Governor Wilkerson’s first district chairman. Served on a committee with Bill Clinton. I went broke, came to Madisonville and asked (Coal Guy) for a job. And he hired me.

“When I went broke, and Coal Guy said basically, he would front the money to open a club. But he said, ‘My name (Coal Guy) cannot be on that club,” because I (Lloyd) was so close to him.

“And really, he wanted the club.

“So I got Cecil Pierce to form a company called Southern Moon Inc., and Bob Moore who used to be the county attorney, set it all up…he was all about opening this club for Coal Guy. Cecil Pierce started running it, all the paperwork was in his name…”

10. Here is an example of a resolution Senator Paul Herron introduced while on the Special Subcommitte of Energy in May of 1999:

“…resolution relating to a coal contract between Peabody Coal Company and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The coal contract issue was brought to the committee’s attention by Senator Paul Herron and the resolution encouraged TVA to require Peabody Coal Company to continue providing coal under the contract from Peabody’s Kentucky union coal mines rather than from out-of-state nonunion coal mines. Senator Freeman said the situation is very serious and involves approximately 1500 coal mining jobs. If those jobs are lost, it will have a devastating impact on the economies of the counties involved. The resolution was adopted by voice vote.”

11. Is a broke, bankrupt Paul Lloyd going to have $15,000 to pay a not-broke, not-bankrupt businessman (and senator’s son) to charter a private plane to fly and haul drugs for him?

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is michael-herron-sentenced-1.png

12. During the Lloyd-Teague meeting, Paul Lloyd mentions Mike Herron is or was married to DeMent’s first cousin. DeMent abruptly changes the subject when this information is revealed.

13. Lloyd tellingly asks Sarah, “Are they gonna release something on me when (redacted) dies?”

14. Paul Lloyd asks Sarah two times: “Did Heather say she knew me?”

15. Paul Lloyd told Sarah he was about to get out of prison after serving his twelve years on the drug case, then he opened up USA Today and Sarah was in there having Heather’s case reopened again. Laughing a big belly laugh, he told her he said at the time, “I ain’t never gonna get out of here!”